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David and Katie Get Re-Married

A musical romp through the trials and tribulations of tying the knot again.

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David Carl and Katie Hartman in a scene from “David and Katie Get Re-Married” at Asylum NYC (Photo credit: Giancarlo Osaben)

[avatar user=”Scotty Bennett” size=”96″ align=”left”] Scotty Bennett, Critic[/avatar]

There was a time when most weddings, especially the first ones, were simple events for family and friends, with a cake, music, and drink. As second and third weddings became more commonplace, complications became more apparent. In this show, the warning was clear: These nuptials are a real-time train wreck, but if you are going to be involved in a train wreck, this is the one to do it in.

David and Katie Get Re-Married is the creation of David Carl and Katie Hartman. Using original songs, funny and timely commentary, and interesting props, they take a musical romp through the trials and tribulations of tying the knot again. Michole Biancosino provides outside-the-box direction for the humorously demented exploration of whether marriage is an institution or whether the people doing it should be institutionalized. In the end, it becomes clear that it is, maybe, both. It is a show to be savored in the afterglow of the experience.

Since nobody in David and Katie’s family wants anything to do with this event, it is up to the audience to help guide them through the exotic rituals they have created to make this joining one that may last, at least until the end of the show.

David Carl and Katie Hartman in a scene from “David and Katie Get Re-Married” at Asylum NYC (Photo credit: Jeannette Bears)

The show is a history of the push-pull of a dysfunctional relationship that led to marriage, divorce, and now back to marriage. David and Katie cleverly use dialogue and song with rear-stage projections to describe the various events they participated in over the years, some sexual, some not, while still maintaining a semblance of sanity. The songs effectively underscore and extend the psycho-drama of their lives together and apart.

The opening song is a setup of what is to follow.

You Can’t Stop This Love

parents tried, friends tried, neighbors tried, lawyers tried

But they can’t stop this Love

 

We are the winners

And also the losers

 

We always Fail Up

We are a Shining example

Of a perfect relationship

David Carl and Katie Hartman in a scene from “David and Katie Get Re-Married” at Asylum NYC (Photo credit: Giancarlo Osaben)

Each of the songs highlights elements of their on-again, off-again relationship. They promise to tell everything about their life together, from their first meeting in college to their polyamorous adventures, their divorce, and finally, their remarriage. The opening scene gives us the literal “blow by blow” of their college years and ends with a story about keeping a wild animal as a pet, referencing the story of a woman whose pet chimpanzee attacked. The story sets the stage for “Chimpanzee Love,” a song about loving something that could damage you, as in another person.

The back and forth of dysfunctional revelations continues with humorous commentary and song. After attempting some rituals as a part of the ceremony, such as releasing a box full of butterflies, using a feather and a stick to express their feelings for each other, or setting off a ritual volcano, they sing songs in an attempt to clarify their relationship, songs such as “Threesome” and “Didn’t We.”

A song about codependence is performed with a couple from the audience who are used as exemplars since the song is called “Codependance” and involves creating dance steps. The musical numbers must be experienced in all their true glory, with the clever dialogue, to be fully appreciated.

David Carl and Katie Hartman in a scene from “David and Katie Get Re-Married” at Asylum NYC (Photo credit: Giancarlo Osaben)

David and Katie go at the truth-telling with a vengeance, letting it all hang out in words and song, revealing things that they had never said before, leading to a major expression of raw emotion. The result appears to be a satisfactory resolution. But, on the other hand, considering what has gone before, it is hard to tell if it will stick this time.

Music director Jody Shelton guides the musical numbers with David on guitar and Katie on ukelele, and he skillfully supports them on the keyboard. David and Katie are fine singers who harmonize in song as they clash in dialogue. Oh, and Asylum NYC has a very well-appointed bar to help the audience get in the spirits before and after the show.

David and Katie Get Re-Married (selected Thursdays through August 22, 2024)

Asylum NYC, 123 East 24th Street, in Manhattan

For tickets, visit http://www.davidandkatiegetremarried.com

Running time: 90 minutes without an intermission

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About Scotty Bennett (80 Articles)
Scotty Bennett is a retired businessman who has worn many hats in his life, the latest of which is theater critic. For the last twelve years he has been a theater critic and is currently the treasurer of the American Theatre Critics Association and a member of the International Association of Theatre Critics. He has been in and around the entertainment business for most of his life. He has been an actor, director, and stage hand. He has done lighting, sound design, and set building. He was a radio disk jockey and, while in college ran a television studio and he even knows how to run a 35mm arc lamp projector.

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