News Ticker

Lisa Renkel

Queens Girl in the World

April 11, 2022

Whether frenetically dancing, rhapsodizing over Nancy Drew, fretting about when she’ll wear a bra or reacting horrified upon learning about sex, Ms. Curry performs with the verve of Lily Tomlin in her prime. Curry’s rich portrayal of Jaqueline Marie Butler captures the wonderment of childhood amidst harsh realities and the physical and emotional upheavals of adolescence. A matter-of-fact confession that Jaqueline has been molested is a chilling highlight. With her wide-eyes, expressive facial features, limber physicality and vocal prowess, Curry often rapidly achieves distinctive characterizations of the dozen other figures in the play. The wizardry of Mika Eubanks’ costume, hair and makeup design all visually enhance Curry’s performance. [more]

Camille O’Sullivan: “Where Are We Now?”

December 8, 2021

David Bowie’s "All the Young Dudes" triumphantly rendered with a touch of Dixieland is one of several grand numbers in the spirited Irish-French performer Camille O'Sullivan’s engaging theatrical concert, “Where Are We Now?” in which she’s backed by a sensational band. That anthem’s familiar rousing opening notes are done justice by Omar Kabir on trumpet. Then clad in a shimmering sequined black skirt suit, black blouse and silver shoes, the long dark-haired alluring Ms. O'Sullivan sings the lyrics in her soaring gutsy voice. That’s while she is wonderfully dancing and miming all over the stage of Irish Arts Center’s $60 million new building and in the aisles. [more]

Emojiland: The Musical

January 29, 2020

Smiling Faces, Skull, Princess, Pile of Poo and other notable emojis cavorting around might have made for a peppy contained sophisticated children’s show. The creators of "Emojiland: The Musical" however, have opted for a full-length treatment that sputters out by intermission as not much has happened and then we come back for more anemic hijinks. The meager plot involves a software update, a firewall, a virus, betrayals and some romantic complications all taking place in a smartphone fantasyland. [more]

Pedro Pan

July 17, 2018

Rebecca Aparicio’s book is a skillful fictionalization of the true story of Operation Pedro Pan, which facilitated the immigration of over 14,000 children from Cuba to the United States between December 1960 and October 1962. Ms. Aparicio successfully dramatizes the harsh era of the Castro regime, the promise of freedom in the U.S. and the realities of racism, all through a child’s perspective. The incidents are illustrative, historical facts are imparted, and the dialogue is engagingly simple yet effective. [more]